Paraplegia

As many as 5,500 people a year are newly diagnosed with paraplegia, or lower extremity paralysis, which is an inability to move the lower part of the body due to a spinal cord injury. In most cases, injury to the spinal cord is caused by accidents, falls, illness, or medical malpractice.

Paraplegia can be complete or incomplete. Complete paraplegia is the total loss of feeling, function and control of the lower part of the body, including loss of feeling, function and control of the legs. Incomplete paraplegia is the partial loss of feeling, function or control of the lower part of the body. In either case, a paraplegic will require a wheelchair to get around.

The extent of paralysis depends on the location of the spinal cord injury. Generally, the higher up the assault to the spinal column, the more extensive the paralysis. Stated differently, someone with a C2 injury may have extensive paralysis, which likely would be diagnosed as quadriplegia. Whereas, someone with a L3 injury may have less extensive paralysis, which likely would be diagnosed as paraplegia.

In addition to loss of feeling, function and control, paraplegics commonly suffer from many other complications, including:

  • Stinging;
  • Shooting pains;
  • Loss of bladder control;
  • Loss of bowel control;
  • Muscle spasms;
  • Impotence; and
  • Shortened lifespan.

The lawyers at Bottar Leone, PLLC, have considerable experience investigating, prosecuting and trying to verdict cases involving severe personal injuries, including paraplegia. Contact us now to discuss your case or concerns.